and brands say robots

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and brands say robots

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Asian leisurewear suppliers Jia Hsin and Tung Mung International are investing millions to automate their factories, and feed Adidas’ and Puma’s insatiable [url=http://www.asdthanit.it/Nike-Air-Max-90-Donne-Rosa-c-39.html]Nike Air Max 90 Donne Rosa[/url] appetites for shoes and clothes.High-tech factories complete with robots are replacing traditional Asian shoe and [url=http://www.jwrennie.co.uk/nike-air-max-2017-c-16/nike-air-max-2017-womens-c-16_18/]Nike Air Max 2017 Womens[/url] clothing plants, especially those supplying top sports brands, like Germany’s Adidas and Puma. It is an unavoidable shift that may slowly bring the era of low-paid workers in foreign countries, toiling in dark factories making garments by hand for Western [url=http://www.asdthanit.it/Adidas-Ultra-Boost-Donne-c-14.html]Adidas Ultra Boost Donne[/url] markets, to an end.

Worker shortages, rising wages and more demanding clients are the main reasons suppliers [url=http://www.asdthanit.it/Nike-Air-Max-2017-Donne-c-34.html]Nike Air Max 2017 Donne[/url] are diving into automation. But above all, the need for speed and efficiency is pushing the Asian textile firms to pour millions [url=http://www.asdthanit.it/Adidas-ZX-Flux-Donne-c-22.html]Adidas ZX Flux Donne[/url] into robots, changing the way these massive operations work.

“At the moment we still need workers to fit the shirts onto the machine,” says YY Chen, owner and manager of Tung Mung International, a Singapore-based clothing exporter whose [url=http://www.lemontlaur.fr/femme-c-1/nike-air-presto-femme-c-1_92/]Nike Air Presto Femme[/url] vietnamese factories supply Adidas. He’s referring to a white robot capable of carrying two dozen polo shirts across [url=http://www.jwrennie.co.uk/nike-air-max-classic-bw-c-33/nike-air-max-classic-bw-mens-c-33_34/]Nike Air Max Classic BW Mens[/url] the factory floor to a giant ironing machine. “But we’ll change that too,” Mr. Chen says.Increased wages for human workers are making them too expensive. “Wage costs are increasing everywhere,” says Jürgen Wormser, the lead shoe purchaser at Adidas rival Puma. Suppliers and brands say robots aren’t there just to lower costs, but that it’s about innovation. [url=http://www.jwrennie.co.uk/]www.jwrennie.co.uk[/url] “Puma isn’t buying our products because we’re cheap, but because we’re good,” says Jerry Huang, managing director of the [url=http://www.royerimprimeur.fr/Nike-Air-Max-1-Femme-Noir-c-1_2.html]Nike Air Max 1 Femme Noir[/url] footwear supplier Jia Hsin. The robots are also more efficient, making fewer mistakes than human workers. “Automation is leading to improved quality,” Mr. Wormser says.

Workers at Tung Mung’s factory outside Ho Chi Minh City will soon have their [url=http://www.amaryllis.es/Nike-Blazer-Mujer-c-1_28.html]Nike Blazer Mujer[/url] tablets replaced by computerized glasses, which guide them to rolls of fabric needed for production. The rolls are [url=http://www.wimatherm.de/nike-air-huarache-c-4/nike-air-huarache-damen-c-4_5/]Nike Air Huarache Damen[/url] equipped with radio frequency identification chips. Mr. Chen’s machines already use lasers to cut out patterns for football jerseys, [url=http://www.jwrennie.co.uk/nike-air-max-90-c-19/nike-air-max-90-mens-c-19_24/]Nike Air Max 90 Mens[/url] minimizing waste, i.e. lost fabric, before they are passed on to seamstresses.